Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Winter for humanity

Hey all (tap, tap, tap). Hello? Is this thing on?

Welp, just poking my head up from a long hiatus to highlight an interesting opinion piece I just read:

The biggest problem climate change poses isn't how the Department of Defense should plan for resource wars, or how we should put up sea walls to protect Alphabet City, or when we should evacuate Hoboken. It won’t be addressed by buying a Prius, signing a treaty, or turning off the air-conditioning.

The biggest problem we face is a philosophical one: understanding that this civilization is already dead. The sooner we confront this problem, and the sooner we realize there’s nothing we can do to save ourselves, the sooner we can get down to the hard work of adapting, with mortal humility, to our new reality.

The choice is a clear one. We can continue acting as if tomorrow will be just like yesterday, growing less and less prepared for each new disaster as it comes, and more and more desperately invested in a life we can’t sustain. Or we can learn to see each day as the death of what came before, freeing ourselves to deal with whatever problems the present offers without attachment or fear.

If we want to learn to live in the Anthropocene, we must first learn how to die.

You know, just a little light and inspirational reading as we had into the long, dark winter months. I wouldn't want anyone to get all depressed or anything, especially my all-time favorite American Prepper, El Borak.

Anyway, I'll catch you crazy scamps in the Silicocene.

tagged: , , ,


  1. He must read Kunstler. If they are right, then the job of the next generation, like it or not, is going to be learning to live an intensely local life.

    I suspect that he's closer to right than wrong, but then again, I haven't lived in the future, so I don't know...

    Captcha: 15 anyfday

    Any f day now we're sure to find out.

  2. ...see you're still reading about things you profess to be sanguine about.


Your turn to riff...